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hellcat
Posts: 27
Joined: Thu Jun 22, 2017 9:29 am

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Post by hellcat » Fri Mar 29, 2019 4:17 pm

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raven
Posts: 50
Joined: Tue Jun 09, 2009 9:59 pm
Location: Portland Oregon

Re: Can anyone translate SNOTEL reports for 2019?

Post by raven » Sat Mar 30, 2019 7:43 am

Low water content and dropping. Perhaps the snow wateryear graph for the Emery Creek snotel will help at
https://wcc.sc.egov.usda.gov/nwcc/view? ... =WATERYEAR

The Montana snotel map is here, zoomed in. Emery Creek is near the Middle Fork
https://www.wcc.nrcs.usda.gov/webmap_be ... 1&zoom=9.5

hellcat
Posts: 27
Joined: Thu Jun 22, 2017 9:29 am

Re: Can anyone translate SNOTEL reports for 2019?

Post by hellcat » Sat Mar 30, 2019 12:21 pm

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hellcat
Posts: 27
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Re: Can anyone translate SNOTEL reports for 2019?

Post by hellcat » Sat Mar 30, 2019 12:26 pm

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raven
Posts: 50
Joined: Tue Jun 09, 2009 9:59 pm
Location: Portland Oregon

Re: Can anyone translate SNOTEL reports for 2019?

Post by raven » Sat Mar 30, 2019 8:24 pm

Hellcat, I do not know if I can help. I'm not a local there, and I do not know your level of expertise.

Translating snow data from the location of measurement to another location requires intimate local knowledge because deposition depends upon storm tracks, wind, altitude, temperature during storms and local features of terrain. I do not have that kind of understanding for Montana.

In general though, the west side of a western mountain range is the damp side, and more moisture accumulates high than low. Emery Creek is west of the Middle Fork and not high. Forget snow depth this time of year and focus on water content because the pack condenses to about 2 inches of snow for one inch of water as it melts out, and then stays at that ratio. The snowpack only has 3/4 the average year's water content and is dropping faster than usual, implying that nearby sites are likely also low in water. Higher sites, with deeper packs, will not go dry as early, but are likely also low.

HTH. You were staring at water content in the graph you claim you knew about before I posted, but apparently were not comprehending the information. The magic number is (maybe) 75% based on Emery Creek.

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