Flatwater touring and staying dry/warm

Keep swimming when you should be rafting? Share or beg for tips and technique .
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Cole
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri May 18, 2012 10:24 am

Flatwater touring and staying dry/warm

Post by Cole » Fri May 18, 2012 11:14 am

I'm planning a trip to Lake Clark area and I had been hoping to do a fair bit of travel by my pack raft. I've used it before on rivers, but never lakes, especially not large lakes with high winds.
I was wondering if anybody has experience with this. In certain situations, like traveling down Twin lakes, I thought it would be interesting and simple way to travel rather than hiking through the brush. Is it feasible to travel at distance along lakes? Is it reasonable to travel 5-10 miles along the shore line in a day or is that just overkill. This summer I plan on doing a lot of experimenting to figure it out but I was hoping someone might be able to tell me more.

Secondly, I haven't yet taken my raft on along distance excursion yet. I'm planning the trip to be about a hundred miles with mixed hiking and paddling, and might include some river travel - class II and III stuff. There doesn't seem to be a clear consensus on whats the best for staying warm on extended trips. I'm looking for light weight but I'd also like to survive. WHats reasonable for river/lake wear on extended backpacking trips? Any ideas and suggestions would be really appreciated. Thanks.

aknickolai
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Jun 12, 2012 9:16 am

Re: Flatwater touring and staying dry/warm

Post by aknickolai » Fri Jul 06, 2012 11:04 am

I've actually done a few flatwater trips in my boat when I've had friends come up from the lower 48 and let them use my canoe. If its not raining, you can stay dry in rain gear. But, if it's raining hard or your running a river I'd say stick with a good dry suit. Gore tex dry suits aren't super bad sweat boxes. The real is fast drying base layers, I recommend IO/Bio brand merino wool and the under armor gear cold year. Under armor performs better under a drysuit and drys a little quicker, but the wool resists smells better and is more comfy. Pair that with a good synthetic puffy coat / paint with rain gear for chilling around camp and you'll be toasty. You could also look into golite tents and ti goat stoves. Put a stove jack in the tent and you'll have a portable shelter and wood stove that weighs very little. Prolly too much to bring the stove and tent on a packraft only trip, but you'll likely have some bigger boat assistance on lake creek.

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